Bay of Angels

Bay of Angels Film poster.

£295.00

Bay of Angels

Product Description

Bay of Angels film poster staring Jeanne Moreau measuring 41″/104cm x 31″/79cm (including frame of 1″/3cm)

Moreau was born on the 23rd of January 1928 and unfortunately died on the 31st of July 2017. She was a French actress, singer, screenwriter and director.

Bay of Angels was filmed in 1963 directed by Jacques Demy. Starring Jeanne Moreau and Claude Mann, it is Demy’s second film and deals with the subject of gambling. 

Jean Fournier (Claude Mann) is a young bank employee who is encouraged by his friend Caron to take an interest in gambling. After winning money in a game of roulette, he decides to vacation in Nice, where he falls in love with Jackie (Jeanne Moreau), divorced and mother to a child she rarely visits. Though Jackie also enjoys Jean’s company, she constantly warns him that her passion for gambling will always be greater.

Jean becomes jealous of not having all of her attention and has mixed feelings about gambling, yet he too is to some extent seduced by this new life style that involves taking risks. Despite Jackie’s cool façade and alleged control over her choices – she claims she is unattached to the money itself, but rather the thrill of the game, and doesn’t mind going from rich to poor in a matter of seconds -, she soon begins to reveal her vulnerability and the emptiness she often feels as result of her addiction.

She won the Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actress for Seven Days… Seven Nights(1960), the BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress for Viva Maria! (1965), and the César Award for Best Actress for The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea (1992). She was also the recipient of several lifetime awards, including a BAFTA Fellowship in 1996.

Moreau made her theatrical debut in 1947, and established herself as one of the leading actresses of the Comédie-Française. She began playing small roles in films in 1949, with impressive performances in the Fernandel vehicleMeurtres? (Three Sinners, 1950) and alongside Jean Gabin as a showgirl/gangster’s moll in the film Touchez pas au grisbi (1954). She achieved prominence as the star of Elevator to the Gallows (1958), directed by Louis Malle, and Jules et Jim (1962), directed by François Truffaut. Most prolific during the 1960s, Moreau continued to appear in films into her eighties.

In 1947, Moreau made her theatrical debut at the Avignon Festival. She debuted at the Comédie-Française in Ivan Turgenev’s A Month in the Country and, by her twenties, was already one of leading actresses in the theatre’s troupe. After 1949, she began appearing in films with small parts but continued primarily active in the theatre for several years—a year at the Théâtre National Populaire opposite among others Gérard Philipe and Robert Hirsch, then a breakout two years in dual roles in The Dazzling Hour by Anna Bonacci, then Jean Cocteau’s La Machine Infernale and others before another two-year run, this time in Shaw’s Pygmalion. From the late 1950s, after appearing in several successful films, she began to work with the emerging generation of French film-makers. Elevator to the Gallows (1958) with first-time director Louis Malle was followed by Malle’s The Lovers (Les Amants, 1959).